juicing

7 Cold-Stomping Remedies

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I love New York, but it can be hard to appreciate the amazing allure of the city at this time of year when it’s cold, dreary, and just plain slushy. The subway echoes with the sounds of sniffling, coughing and sneezing, and the common cold seems to lurk around every corner. A cold, like the flu, is viral and therefore resistant to antibiotics. But unlike the flu, which is a much more serious concern, the common cold is usually pretty mild, lasting between 7 to 10 days. That said, it shouldn’t be trivialized because it is the leading cause of doctor’s visits, sick days, and can put a real damper on your quality of life.

Since we are still at the peak of the cold and flu season (I know, I know, will it never end?), it’s a perfect time to talk about ways to prevent the common cold from occurring in the first place.

#1. Get your zzzzz time. Back in April, the Bushwick Nutrition blog looked into sleep for weight control. Not surprisingly, sleep has even more benefits as people who do not get enough sleep (less than 7 hours), are 3 to 5 times more likely to develop a cold. This makes total sense since sleep is an important predictor of immunity. So make sure to put sleep as your number one priority during these cold months!

#2. Eat more fresh garlic. Garlic is a popular folk remedy but recent studies have shown that eating garlic can boost the number of T-cells in the bloodstream, which play a vital role in strengthening the immune system and fighting viruses like the common cold. Tip: Garlic must be fresh. as the active ingredient is destroyed within an hour or so after smashing. Compress, smash, or juice/blend the garlic to maximize benefits. Try Raquel’s, owner of Pitanga Juice, remedy of fresh garlic, raw honey, cayenne pepper, and lemon (see pic). Talk about a serious immune boost! Tip: For easier digestion, mix the above with a little aloe vera juice.

#3. Hydrate! Not only do liquids prevent dehydration, but hot liquids relieve nasal congestion, soothe inflammation in the nose and throat area, and keep the gut moving. You want to aid your immune system by helping it work better especially during these dry months, and water forms a part of every cell in the body! Try elderberry or herbal teas with honey and lime. 

#4. Get your green on. Juicing or blending can be a great way to incorporate amazing greens like kale, bok choy, and arugula (to name a few) into your diet. They are naturally high in vitamins A and C that help keep your immune system strong, while also aiding with inflammation. Note: Taking large doses of vitamin C has NOT proven to help combat a cold. That said, it is beneficial to meet your daily needs – about 75 to 90mg a day (a little different than the 1000mg megadoses!).

#5. Keep your gut healthy with pro/prebiotic rich food sources. The gut plays a huge role in keeping your immune system strong. After all, 70% of immune cells are found in the gut! Therefore, eating foods like Greek yogurt, kefir, kombucha, sauerkraut, miso, and sourdough bread, which all have “good bacteria”, as well as prebiotic food sources that feed the healthy bacteria, like whole grains, bananas, artichokes, onions and leeks, will only make you stronger.

#6. Mushrooms are the immune system cheerleaders. Mushrooms are antiviral and antibacterial. They also encourage your immune cells to multiply. Reishi mushrooms are particularly beneficial for respiratory conditions, so eat up!

#7. Work it out. Chronic stress suppresses the immune cells and exercise is a great de-stressor. By exercising regularly you are not only helping your heart, your metabolism and your digestion, but you are also helping your immune system do a better job! A study in the Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise showed that people who engaged in regular to moderate activity lowered their risk of flu by 33%! That said- if you are already feeling sick, skip the workout and save your energy. 

How do you keep the common cold at bay?

Written by Alanna Cabrero, MS, RD, CDN 

Photographed by Pitanga Juice. 

Edited by Tamara Cabrero & NYHRC Team 

Pulp It Up!

Since Bushwick Nutrition covered the pros and cons of juicing in the July 2013 Juicing Vs Blending 101 post, the juicing craze has only picked up momentum. Even those who notoriously avoided the kitchen have jumped on the juicing bandwagon, whipping up creative combinations that are bursting with flavor and nutritional value. Let’s squeeze out even more nutritional benefits from this juicing addiction. Did you know you can use the power packed pulp?

Pulp Facts, Not Fiction

In case you have yet to tango with a juicer yourself, let me explain the basics.When you juice fruits, veggies, or other, your juicer separates the juice (extract) into one container and the fiber (or pulp) into another. Most people who juice tend to throw away this pulp. It’s true that much of the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants are in the juice, but there are actually nutrients left in the pulp, not to mention all the great fiber. As a Registered Dietitian,I am extremely pro-fiber and hate to see such rich pulp go to waste when there are so many exciting ways to use this secret source of nutritional power. Throwing the pulp away is an even more perplexing phenomenon because most people only get 50% of their recommended daily allowance of fiber!

For people who have difficulty digesting fiber, juicing may be their only option. But for most people, fiber is essential. Research suggests that fiber reduces the risk of CVD, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and certain gastrointestinal disorders (constipation, reflux, ulcers,). In addition, it improves cholesterol levels, such as total cholesterol and LDL (Lethal) cholesterol. Fiber is also imperative in the management of blood sugar and insulin sensitivity, making it a great nutrient for people with diabetes or those who are at risk for developing diabetes.  And of course, fiber helps us feel full for a longer period of time, contributing to a healthy body weight. 

So in order to take advantage of this excess fiber, while reducing waste and getting our green on, here are ways to use the pulp. Let’s pulp it up! 

Consider that fruit-based pulp lends itself to sweet recipes while vegetable-based pulp makes for better savory dishes. Adding pulp to any of the recipe ideas below adds quick nutritional properties, taste and texture to any meal or snack.

Fruit-Based Recipe Ideas

  • Smoothies
  • Pancakes
  • Pulp-cicles
  • Pulp-cubes
  • Bread  
  • Jam
  • Muffins

Veggie-Based Recipe Ideas

  • Pasta Sauce
  • Guacamole
  • Soups
  • Stews
  • Salads
  • Tacos
  • Quesadillas
  • Savory Bread
  • Mac & Cheese
  • Cream Cheese
  • Veggie Burgers
  • Rice Pilaf
  • Casseroles

It is incredible how many recipes are available online with pulp as a primary ingredient. And it makes sense! You get twice the value for your buck, twice the nutrition and fiber and the satisfaction of minimizing unnecessary waste. Try out the simple recipe below and embrace the power of pulp! 

Juice Pulp Bread Adapted from The Fresh Beet

  • 2 cups pulp (in this case, carrots, beets, and ginger)
  • 1 ½ cups whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup of canola or coconut oil
  • ½ cup honey or Agave nectar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ cup nuts, chopped
  • ½ cup raisins or cranberries, no added sugars (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg or clove
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt

1. Beat together oil and honey, then add eggs, vanilla and pulp.

2. Sift dry ingredients and add to pulp mixture.

3. Add nuts last.

4. Bake in a greased 9″loaf pan at 350 F for 50 to 60 minutes.

There are endless opportunities to use pulp in recipes. Have you tried using pulp? 

Written and photographed by Alanna Cabrero, MS, RD

Originally posted at NYHRC Tumblr 

Edited by Tamara Cabrero & NYHRC Team 

Juicing vs. Blending 101  
 Juice bars are the latest of health trends to take the city by storm. It seems like every New Yorkcorner is sprouting a  juice bar  these days. Between Juice Generation, Juice Press,Organic Avenue, Liqueteria, The Butcher’s Daughter and others, this trend is becoming impossible to ignore.    
 Here is the breakdown:    
  Juicing:  
 Extracting the juice of the fruit removes most of the fiber as well as some nutrients such as antioxidants, protein, and essential fatty acids. Fruit juice has been touted for lowering risk of cancer and Alzheimer’s, helping with weight loss, providing a glow to skin, and aiding with detoxification. Experts believe that this concentrated form of nutrition makes vitamins, minerals, and enzymes easier for the body to absorb, although there is little scientific evidence to support this belief. 
 Pros 
  Requires minimal effort to digest, therefore providing quick delivery of nutrients to the blood stream and giving the digestive system a break. 
 Is a helpful way to increase intake of fruits and vegetables for people who do not consume enough on a daily basis, which is most people! 
 Is useful for people sensitive to fiber (especially insoluble fiber that acts as a “mild laxative”) since most fiber is left out. 
  Cons 
  Removes most of the fiber (except some soluble fiber) and 10-20% of the antioxidants. 
 Allows fast delivery of sugars to the blood stream, drastically affecting blood sugar levels, and is therefore not recommended for diabetics or those at higher risk of developing diabetes. 
 Is not usually satisfying as a meal or snack. 
 Juicers are expensive, ranging anywhere from $200 - $500 dollars, and readymade juices can cost anywhere from $6 - $12 for a 16 oz juice!    
 Is time consuming to prepare and typically involves extensive cleanup time. 
   Blending:  
 Blending or emulsifying uses the whole fruit or vegetable, along with some liquid, to form a puree. You get everything the whole food has to offer including vitamins, minerals, enzymes, proteins, essential fatty acids, antioxidants and fiber. 
   Fiber   has been proven to reduce the risk of CVD, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and certain gastrointestinal disorders (reflux, ulcers, constipation, etc). Higher intake improves total and LDL cholesterol, blood glucose, and insulin sensitivity both in children and adults. Most people consume less than 50% of their recommended fiber quantity! 
 Pros 
  Expedites delivery of nutrients to the blood stream without significantly spiking blood sugars because of the natural fiber content. 
 Requires only a small amount of digestion, giving the digestive system a break. 
 Makes more nutrients available to the body because the whole plant is being consumed. For example, vegetable and fruit skins contain some of the highest concentrations of nutrients. 
 Blenders, even including new machines like NutriBullet, only cost between $20 - $120, 
 Allows for faster preparation and easier cleanup than juicing. 
  Cons 
  Can cause bloating and gas, especially if you are sensitive to fiber or not accustomed to much fiber in your diet. 
 Can make taste and texture difficult to manipulate.     
 Might decrease naturally-occurring enzymes because some blenders create too much heat if left to blend for too long.    
   Whether blended or juiced, a liquid diet is NOT usually a balanced diet.  Fruits and vegetables have little to no protein or fat, and therefore should not be your sole source of nutrition. I would not follow a strictly liquid diet for more than 2-3 days, maximum! 
  In my opinion, blending is higher in nutrition and a more efficient source of energy.  In addition, it doesn’t spike blood sugars so drastically and helps increase fiber intake, which has been chronically low across all ages.    
  Bottom line:  juicing or blending can be a part of a healthy diet if followed in moderation. Indulge in an 8-oz juice or smoothie when you have a sweet craving or make it a part of your mid-morning or afternoon snack. Even better, replace your sweetened beverage (coffee, energy drink, soda) with a small juice or smoothie. 
 Stay tuned for  Part II ! 
 Originally posted on  NYHRC Tumblr   
 Written by  Alanna Cabrero, MS, RD  
 References:  Juicing: Your Key to Radiant Health.     Mercola      To juice or to blend?     NutriBullet Blog   AndersonJW, Baird P, et al. Health benefits of dietary fiber.     Nutrition Reviews     2009. The Pros And Cons Of Juicing.     Food Republic  .   
 Edited by  TCabrarr  

Juicing vs. Blending 101

Juice bars are the latest of health trends to take the city by storm. It seems like every New Yorkcorner is sprouting a juice bar these days. Between Juice Generation, Juice Press,Organic Avenue, Liqueteria, The Butcher’s Daughter and others, this trend is becoming impossible to ignore. 

Here is the breakdown: 

Juicing:

Extracting the juice of the fruit removes most of the fiber as well as some nutrients such as antioxidants, protein, and essential fatty acids. Fruit juice has been touted for lowering risk of cancer and Alzheimer’s, helping with weight loss, providing a glow to skin, and aiding with detoxification. Experts believe that this concentrated form of nutrition makes vitamins, minerals, and enzymes easier for the body to absorb, although there is little scientific evidence to support this belief.

Pros

  • Requires minimal effort to digest, therefore providing quick delivery of nutrients to the blood stream and giving the digestive system a break.
  • Is a helpful way to increase intake of fruits and vegetables for people who do not consume enough on a daily basis, which is most people!
  • Is useful for people sensitive to fiber (especially insoluble fiber that acts as a “mild laxative”) since most fiber is left out.

Cons

  • Removes most of the fiber (except some soluble fiber) and 10-20% of the antioxidants.
  • Allows fast delivery of sugars to the blood stream, drastically affecting blood sugar levels, and is therefore not recommended for diabetics or those at higher risk of developing diabetes.
  • Is not usually satisfying as a meal or snack.
  • Juicers are expensive, ranging anywhere from $200 - $500 dollars, and readymade juices can cost anywhere from $6 - $12 for a 16 oz juice! 
  • Is time consuming to prepare and typically involves extensive cleanup time.

Blending:

Blending or emulsifying uses the whole fruit or vegetable, along with some liquid, to form a puree. You get everything the whole food has to offer including vitamins, minerals, enzymes, proteins, essential fatty acids, antioxidants and fiber.

Fiber has been proven to reduce the risk of CVD, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and certain gastrointestinal disorders (reflux, ulcers, constipation, etc). Higher intake improves total and LDL cholesterol, blood glucose, and insulin sensitivity both in children and adults. Most people consume less than 50% of their recommended fiber quantity!

Pros

  • Expedites delivery of nutrients to the blood stream without significantly spiking blood sugars because of the natural fiber content.
  • Requires only a small amount of digestion, giving the digestive system a break.
  • Makes more nutrients available to the body because the whole plant is being consumed. For example, vegetable and fruit skins contain some of the highest concentrations of nutrients.
  • Blenders, even including new machines like NutriBullet, only cost between $20 - $120,
  • Allows for faster preparation and easier cleanup than juicing.

Cons

  • Can cause bloating and gas, especially if you are sensitive to fiber or not accustomed to much fiber in your diet.
  • Can make taste and texture difficult to manipulate.  
  • Might decrease naturally-occurring enzymes because some blenders create too much heat if left to blend for too long. 

Whether blended or juiced, a liquid diet is NOT usually a balanced diet. Fruits and vegetables have little to no protein or fat, and therefore should not be your sole source of nutrition. I would not follow a strictly liquid diet for more than 2-3 days, maximum!

In my opinion, blending is higher in nutrition and a more efficient source of energy. In addition, it doesn’t spike blood sugars so drastically and helps increase fiber intake, which has been chronically low across all ages. 

Bottom line: juicing or blending can be a part of a healthy diet if followed in moderation. Indulge in an 8-oz juice or smoothie when you have a sweet craving or make it a part of your mid-morning or afternoon snack. Even better, replace your sweetened beverage (coffee, energy drink, soda) with a small juice or smoothie.

Stay tuned for Part II!

Originally posted on NYHRC Tumblr 

Written by Alanna Cabrero, MS, RD

References:
Juicing: Your Key to Radiant Health. Mercola 
To juice or to blend? NutriBullet Blog
AndersonJW, Baird P, et al. Health benefits of dietary fiber. Nutrition Reviews 2009. The Pros And Cons Of Juicing. Food Republic

Edited by TCabrarr